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You agree to indemnify and hold National Geographic, its NG Affiliates, subcontractors and other partners, and their respective officers, agents, partners and employees, harmless from any loss, liability, claim, or demand, including, but not limited to, reasonable attorneys' fees, made by any third-party due to or arising out of or in connection with your use of the Product, your breach of this Agreement, or your violation of any rights of another, on or through or in connection with the Product.
“ No sight so sad as that of a naughty child," he began, "especially a naughty little girl. Do you know where the wicked go after death?" "They go to hell," was my ready and orthodox answer. "And what is hell? Can you tell me that?" "A pit full of fire." "And should you like to fall into that pit, and to be burning there for ever?" "No, sir." "What must you do to avoid it?" I deliberated a moment: my answer, when it did come was objectionable: "I must keep in good health and not die. ”
(1) National Geographic, including our parents, subsidiaries or affiliates (“NG Affiliates”), agents, employees, predecessors in interest, successors, and assigns, and you agree that any Dispute (as defined herein) between you and National Geographic, regarding any aspect of your relationship with National Geographic relating to the National Geographic Genographic Project and the Product, will be resolved in a binding, confidential, individual and fair arbitration process, and not in court. Each of you and National Geographic agrees to give up the right to sue in court. The term “Dispute” is to be given the broadest possible meaning that will be enforced, and shall include any dispute, claim, demand, count, cause of action, or controversy between you and National Geographic, whether based in contract, statute, regulation, ordinance, tort (including, but not limited to, fraud, misrepresentation, fraudulent inducement, negligence, or any other intentional tort), or any other legal or equitable theory. The term “Dispute” specifically includes, but is not limited to, any and all claims between you and National Geographic in any way related to or concerning this Arbitration Agreement, any other aspect of these Terms (including their applicability and their conformance to applicable law), any products or services provided by National Geographic relating to the National Geographic Genographic project, any billing disputes, and any disputes relating to telephonic, text message, or any other communications either of us received from the other. The only exceptions to this Arbitration Agreement are that (i) each of you and National Geographic retains the right to sue in small claims court and (ii) each of you and National Geographic may bring suit in court against the other to enjoin infringement or other misuse of intellectual property rights. Disputes over whether these exceptions apply shall be resolved by the court in which such action has been brought; all other disputes over arbitrability shall be resolved by the arbitrator. Each of you and National Geographic also agrees to give up the ability to seek to represent, in a class action or otherwise, anyone but each of you and National Geographic (see paragraph 9 of this Arbitration Agreement below). There is no judge or jury in arbitration, and court review of an arbitration award is limited. An arbitrator must follow this Arbitration Agreement. The arbitrator, however, can award on an individual basis the same damages and relief as a court (including injunctive and declaratory relief, or statutory damages).
Each year a committee of the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) identifies the best of the best in children's books. According to the Notables Criteria, "notable" is defined as: Worthy of note or notice, important, distinguished, outstanding. As applied to children's books, notable should be thought to include books of especially commendable quality, books that exhibit venturesome creativity, and books of fiction, information, poetry and pictures for all age levels (birth through age 14) that reflect and encourage children's interests in exemplary ways.
We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the likes of Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen, they’ve produced characters and conceits that have become the currency of our pop-culture discourse—and inspired some of our best writers to contribute to the genre. To honor the best books for young adults and children, TIME compiled this survey in consultation with respected peers such as U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate Kenn Nesbitt, children’s-book historian Leonard Marcus, the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature, the Young Readers Center at the Library of Congress, the Every Child a Reader literacy foundation and 10 independent booksellers. With their help, we’ve created two all-time lists of classics: 100 Best Young-Adult Books and 100 Best Children’s Books. Vote for your favorite in the poll below.
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