This Agreement will be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the laws of the State of New York, without regard to its conflict of law provisions. Except with respect to Disputes to be resolved through an arbitration process in accordance with the Arbitration Agreement contained above, you and National Geographic agree to submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts located in New York, New York to resolve any Dispute arising out of this Agreement or the Product. YOU HEREBY KNOWINGLY, VOLUNTARILY AND INTENTIONALLY WAIVE ANY RIGHT YOU MAY HAVE TO A TRIAL BY JURY IN RESPECT OF ANY LITIGATION (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY CLAIMS, COUNTERCLAIMS, CROSS-CLAIMS, OR THIRD-PARTY CLAIMS) ARISING OUT OF, UNDER OR IN CONNECTION WITH THIS AGREEMENT.
“Grandma” Gatewood is finally getting her due. Just this summer, the New York Times gave a long overdue obituary of Emma Gatewood, the first woman to hike the Appalachian Trail by herself in one season (at the ripe old age of 67). Gatewood was a mother of 11, a grandmother, and great-grandmother when she first hiked the trail. By the time she died 16 years after her first hike in 1973, she had completed the AT three times — setting the record as the first person to ever complete the trail more than once. Her story has also, finally, made it’s way to a children’s book this year, one whose clear, sparkling prose and beautiful illustrations by Jennifer Thermes give this real-life tale the inspirational platform it deserves.
“Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue. The art is gorgeous and it tells the story of a little girl going to bed so gently. In response to her assertion that she isn’t tired, her parents just say, ’We understand. Please brush your teeth. You can stay up as late as you like.′ It’s just lovely and presents an example of engaging with your child that isn’t adversarial. I think it’s a nice model and so pretty.” ― Allison Sook
This Agreement will be governed by, and construed in accordance with, the laws of the State of New York, without regard to its conflict of law provisions. Except with respect to Disputes to be resolved through an arbitration process in accordance with the Arbitration Agreement contained above, you and National Geographic agree to submit to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts located in New York, New York to resolve any Dispute arising out of this Agreement or the Product. YOU HEREBY KNOWINGLY, VOLUNTARILY AND INTENTIONALLY WAIVE ANY RIGHT YOU MAY HAVE TO A TRIAL BY JURY IN RESPECT OF ANY LITIGATION (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY CLAIMS, COUNTERCLAIMS, CROSS-CLAIMS, OR THIRD-PARTY CLAIMS) ARISING OUT OF, UNDER OR IN CONNECTION WITH THIS AGREEMENT.
A dog goes, or doesn’t go, for a walk in this charming book by English author and illustrator Claire Messer. There’s much to endear Lazybones to the young reader, from Messer’s bright prints to the (relatable) reluctance of the titular Lazybones (real name: Robert Exelby Perdendo). Oh, and two boy dogs in love is no big deal here. Why should it be? After all, it’s just puppy love.
(11) With the exception of subpart (a) in paragraph (5) (i.e., the waiver of the ability to proceed on behalf of multiple claimants or a purported class), if any part of this Arbitration Agreement is deemed invalid, unenforceable, or illegal, then the balance of this Arbitration Agreement shall remain in effect and be construed in accordance with its terms as if the invalid, unenforceable, or illegal provision were not contained. If, however, subpart (a) in paragraph (5) is found invalid, unenforceable or illegal, then the entirety of this Arbitration Agreement shall be null and void, but the rest of this Agreement, including the provisions governing where actions against National Geographic must be pursued, the choice of governing law, and our mutual waiver of the right to a trial by jury, will remain in effect and apply to any claim that, for this or any other reason, proceeds in court rather than in arbitration.
“Llama Llama Red Pajama from Anna Dewdney is my son’s favorite book. The baby llama wants his momma (he’s supposed to be going to sleep) and screams bloody murder when she doesn’t come back up right away. Good book for opening conversations about patience, anxiety, and nighttime fears! Ten years later, I can still recite it from memory. Also check out a recent rap version by Ludacris on YouTube.” ― Elizabeth Washburn Galbraith
From picture books to graphic novels, fantasy to family fun, these must-read books have the power to hook both boys and girls. Some are cultural touchstones that belong in every kid's library. Others open kids' minds to cultures beyond their own. And some are modern releases that have the timeless quality of classics -- the kinds that get handed down to siblings and passed around classrooms. Whether you have a reluctant reader or budding bookworm, check out these surefire, kid-tested titles. (We've included a few rated best for 12 and up for the precocious readers out there!)
“Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue. The art is gorgeous and it tells the story of a little girl going to bed so gently. In response to her assertion that she isn’t tired, her parents just say, ’We understand. Please brush your teeth. You can stay up as late as you like.′ It’s just lovely and presents an example of engaging with your child that isn’t adversarial. I think it’s a nice model and so pretty.” ― Allison Sook
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