100 Great Children’s Books has been published on the occasion of The New York Public Library’s acclaimed exhibition The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter, on view at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. The list was selected by The New York Public Library’s Jeanne Lamb, Coordinator, Youth Collections, and Elizabeth Bird, Supervising Librarian. 

2 years & up. Get ready for bedtime with Llama Llama! The Llama Llama Large Plush makes a great companion for little ones and ideal for comforting hugs and snuggles. In the book, Llama Llama is ready for bedtime in his red pajamas and gets tucked in by his mama. She goes downstairs and she doesn't come back right away so Baby Llama begins to worry and fret until she returns. This story of Llama Llama relates to children and the need for their mother's comfort. Hardcover book includes 40 pages.… More »


When you purchase the Geno 2.0 Next Gen Helix Product, you will receive a saliva collection kit from our partner Helix. When you return your saliva sample to Helix, Helix will sequence your DNA. That sequence is your “Genetic Information.” Helix will share with National Geographic the portion of your Genetic Information needed by National Geographic to provide you with your deep ancestry insights (we’re calling this your “Genographic Genetic Information”). We will use this Genographic Genetic Information to produce your Geno 2.0 Next Gen Helix Product results.

{"description": {},"productinfo": {"age_range": "4 to 8","amazonbullet1": "Officially Licensed National Geographic product.","amazoncat": "Books","ISBN": "9781426308383"},"shipping": {"days": "This item ships within 1 business day."},"shipsto": {"country": "This item ships to the USA , Canada, Antigua West Indies, Austria, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Belize, Switzerland, Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Germany, Denmark, Ecuador, Spain, Finland, France, Honduras, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Nicaragua, Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, Poland, Sweden, United Kingdom."},"sku": {"parent": "NGOGEOKBBWA3"},"pre_order": false
Even if we didn’t spot the Tribe Called Quest and Mingus vinyl in the background,  Zach O’Hora’s tale of mistaken identity — Ralph for Niblet; Niblet for Ralph — has enough sophistication and nuance to amuse adult readers while the sweet simple message (be neighborly) and O’Hora’s strong illustrations (turquoise, ochre, thick black line) make it kiddie catnip.
Fifty years after Don Freeman introduced the lovable bear to the world, actor Viola Davis updates the series. Davis, who grew up poor in Rhode Island, used to spend her afternoons at the library where Freeman’s stories of the bear and his benefactor, a young African American girl named Lisa, kept the young actress company. Now she returns the favor with Corduroy Takes A Bow in which the bear takes a much-belated interest in the world of theater.

“ No sight so sad as that of a naughty child," he began, "especially a naughty little girl. Do you know where the wicked go after death?" "They go to hell," was my ready and orthodox answer. "And what is hell? Can you tell me that?" "A pit full of fire." "And should you like to fall into that pit, and to be burning there for ever?" "No, sir." "What must you do to avoid it?" I deliberated a moment: my answer, when it did come was objectionable: "I must keep in good health and not die. ”
Amy Krause Rosenthal, a novelist, TED talker, radio host, and children’s book author, died in 2017 after battling ovarian cancer. She gave the world many gifts. Don’t Blink!, her latest children’s book, is a gift to parents at bedtime. A bedtime book that dares children to stay awake, it presents a plea bargain to kids who don’t want to go to bed: if you don’t blink, you don’t have to go to bed. The catch? Every time they do blink, they must turn a page. Reach the end and its night-night. A big-eyed owl acts as the guide, offering a variety of fun tactics for the postponement of blinking and therefore bedtime. It’s a cleverly constructed story, one that should always arrive at the same ending: with heavy eyelids and a head on the pillow.
Tags contributing to this page include: childrens, childhood, childhood-books, childhood-favorites, childhood-reads, children, children-books, children-s, children-s-books, children-s-fiction, children-s-lit, children-s-literature, children-ya, childrens-and-ya, childrens-books, childrens-fiction, childrens-lit, childrens-literature, childrens-ya, childrensbooks, dzieciństwo, genre__childrens_general_fiction, infanzia, kiddie, kiddielit, kidlit, kids, kids-books, książki-z-dzieciństwa, little-kids-books, medium-kids-books, read-aloud-to-child, and read-children-s-books
We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the likes of Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen, they’ve produced characters and conceits that have become the currency of our pop-culture discourse—and inspired some of our best writers to contribute to the genre. To honor the best books for young adults and children, TIME compiled this survey in consultation with respected peers such as U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate Kenn Nesbitt, children’s-book historian Leonard Marcus, the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature, the Young Readers Center at the Library of Congress, the Every Child a Reader literacy foundation and 10 independent booksellers. With their help, we’ve created two all-time lists of classics: 100 Best Young-Adult Books and 100 Best Children’s Books. Vote for your favorite in the poll below.
×