A dog goes, or doesn’t go, for a walk in this charming book by English author and illustrator Claire Messer. There’s much to endear Lazybones to the young reader, from Messer’s bright prints to the (relatable) reluctance of the titular Lazybones (real name: Robert Exelby Perdendo). Oh, and two boy dogs in love is no big deal here. Why should it be? After all, it’s just puppy love.
National Geographic will analyze your DNA to determine what migratory routes your deep ancestors followed and to which branch of the Phylogenetic tree you belong. THE TESTS DO NOT TELL US ANYTHING ABOUT YOUR HEALTH, OR ABOUT ANY HEALTH PROBLEMS YOU (OR YOUR FAMILY) MAY HAVE. Once National Geographic has conducted the DNA analysis, you will be able to access your personal genetic migratory profile by logging on to the Genographic Project's personal gateway web page at https://genographic.nationalgeographic.com/ and using the password provided to you.

Crane, Dozer, and Digger are the anthropomorphized construction equipment of this story but Digger is the only one with a thumping heart. It is he who stumbles upon a single blue flower growing on the last bare patch of land in the city and subsequently saves it from harm before nurturing it back to life. It’s a spare story about protecting nature told without much humor but instead, like its main character, a lot of heart and compassion.
100 Great Children’s Books has been published on the occasion of The New York Public Library’s acclaimed exhibition The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter, on view at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. The list was selected by The New York Public Library’s Jeanne Lamb, Coordinator, Youth Collections, and Elizabeth Bird, Supervising Librarian. 
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