(4) If either you or National Geographic wants to arbitrate a Dispute, you or National Geographic must first send by mail to the other a written Notice of Dispute (“Notice”) that sets forth the name, address, and contact information of the party giving notice, the specific facts giving rise to the Dispute, the NG Service to which the Notice relates, and the relief requested. Your Notice to the National Geographic must be sent by mail to Arbitration Notice of Dispute, c/o Business and Legal Affairs, Litigation VP, 1145 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20036. The National Geographic will send any Notice to you at the contact information we have for you or that you provide. It is the sender’s responsibility to ensure that the recipient receives the Notice. During the first 45 days after you or we send a Notice to the other, you and we may try to reach a settlement of the Dispute.

When you purchase the Geno 2.0 Next Gen Helix Product, you will receive a saliva collection kit from our partner Helix. When you return your saliva sample to Helix, Helix will sequence your DNA. That sequence is your “Genetic Information.” Helix will share with National Geographic the portion of your Genetic Information needed by National Geographic to provide you with your deep ancestry insights (we’re calling this your “Genographic Genetic Information”). We will use this Genographic Genetic Information to produce your Geno 2.0 Next Gen Helix Product results.
We’re living in a golden age of young-adult literature, when books ostensibly written for teens are equally adored by readers of every generation. In the likes of Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen, they’ve produced characters and conceits that have become the currency of our pop-culture discourse—and inspired some of our best writers to contribute to the genre. To honor the best books for young adults and children, TIME compiled this survey in consultation with respected peers such as U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate Kenn Nesbitt, children’s-book historian Leonard Marcus, the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature, the Young Readers Center at the Library of Congress, the Every Child a Reader literacy foundation and 10 independent booksellers. With their help, we’ve created two all-time lists of classics: 100 Best Young-Adult Books and 100 Best Children’s Books. Vote for your favorite in the poll below.
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