Hi and welcome to my little corner of the internet! I'm Kate Sorensen and I LOVE to find deals on all things kitchen, family, home, beauty, women's & kid's clothing and more. While finding some deals here and there is fun, I also have a true passion for cooking and baking, so I'll share some of my favorite family recipes with you, as well as products that I think totally rock, too. Want to get in contact with me? Please email me at Kate@couponcravings.com. I'd love to hear from you!

Although most commonly worn by and associated with babies and children, diapers are also worn by adults for a variety of reasons. In the medical community, they are usually referred to as "adult absorbent briefs" rather than diapers, which are associated with children and may have a negative connotation. The usage of adult diapers can be a source of embarrassment,[35] and products are often marketed under euphemisms such as incontinence pads. The most common adult users of diapers are those with medical conditions which cause them to experience urinary like bed wetting or fecal incontinence, or those who are bedridden or otherwise limited in their mobility.
Keep in mind that each diaper brand can have a different fit around the waist and legs, so it’s a good idea to try different ones. A good fit means less leakage and blowouts—better for you, your baby and your washing machine. If you begin experiencing issues with a diaper you and your baby already liked, it’s probably just time to move up a size. (Newborn sizes go up to about 10 lbs, so your little one will probably grow into the next size around one month.)
During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market, and in 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Victor Mills, along with his project group including William Dehaas (both men who worked for the company) invented what would be trademarked "Pampers". Although Pampers were conceptualized in 1959, the diapers themselves were not launched into the market until 1961.[11] Pampers now accounts for more than $10 billion in annual revenue at Procter & Gamble.[12]

In 1947, Scottish housewife Valerie Hunter Gordon started developing and making Paddi, a 2-part system consisting of a disposable pad (made of cellulose wadding covered with cotton wool) worn inside an adjustable plastic garment with press-studs/snaps. Initially, she used old parachutes for the garment. She applied for the patent in April 1948, and it was granted for the UK in October 1949. Initially, the big manufacturers were unable to see the commercial possibilities of disposable nappies. In 1948, Gordon made over 400 Paddis herself using her sewing machine at the kitchen table. Her husband had unsuccessfully approached several companies for help until he had a chance meeting with Sir Robert Robinson at a business dinner. In November 1949 Valerie Gordon signed a contract with Robinsons of Chesterfield who then went into full production. In 1950, Boots UK agreed to sell Paddi in all their branches. In 1951 the Paddi patent was granted for the USA and worldwide. Shortly after that, Playtex and several other large international companies tried unsuccessfully to buy out Paddi from Robinsons. Paddi was very successful for many years until the advent of 'all in one' diapers.[8][9]
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If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.
During the 1950s, companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Kendall, Parke-Davis, Playtex, and Molnlycke entered the disposable diaper market, and in 1956, Procter & Gamble began researching disposable diapers. Victor Mills, along with his project group including William Dehaas (both men who worked for the company) invented what would be trademarked "Pampers". Although Pampers were conceptualized in 1959, the diapers themselves were not launched into the market until 1961.[11] Pampers now accounts for more than $10 billion in annual revenue at Procter & Gamble.[12]
Note: The pricing here isn’t static: these are the approximate costs for size 1 diapers bought in bulk (and even those are liable to change frequently online). As you go up in sizing (to size 2, 3, etc.), the price per diaper will increase. And, like anything else, the more you buy, the cheaper diapers are. Thus, buying in bulk saves a fair amount. More on sizing and pricing in a minute….
Keep in mind that each diaper brand can have a different fit around the waist and legs, so it’s a good idea to try different ones. A good fit means less leakage and blowouts—better for you, your baby and your washing machine. If you begin experiencing issues with a diaper you and your baby already liked, it’s probably just time to move up a size. (Newborn sizes go up to about 10 lbs, so your little one will probably grow into the next size around one month.)
A baby may need to be changed up to 14 times a day, which makes buying diapers and wipes in bulk a smart and convenient solution. Stock up on baby wipes designed to keep your baby's face, hands and bottom clean and soft. Choose from wipes that feature soothing aloe, are eco-friendly, or fragrance-free for sensitive skin. From preemie to toddler sizes, you can wrap your baby in a diaper that gently hugs their body and offers superb absorbent protection both day and night.
If your goal is to get a trash can to conceal the smell, there are three that parents favor: the Baby Trend Diaper Champ ($34, pictured left) is an inexpensive pail that uses regular tall kitchen trash bags (yay!). Simply place the diaper in the opening, then pull the handle so it drops down into the can. So easy and best of all, no squishing a poop-filled mess through a narrow slot, like with the Diaper Genie (yuck!), although I will admit you can still smell poop with this one.
The age at which children should cease regularly wearing diapers and toilet training should begin is a subject of debate. Proponents of baby-led potty training and Elimination Communication argue that potty training can begin at birth with multiple benefits, with diapers only used as a back up. Keeping children in diapers beyond infancy can be controversial, with family psychologist John Rosemond claiming it is a "slap to the intelligence of a human being that one would allow baby to continue soiling and wetting himself past age two."[26] Pediatrician T. Berry Brazelton, however, believes that toilet training is the child's choice and has encouraged this view in various commercials for Pampers Size 6, a diaper for older children.[26] Brazelton warns that enforced toilet training can cause serious longterm problems, and that it is the child's decision when to stop wearing diapers, not the parents'.[26][27]
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