This bilingual tale, written by Dragons love Tacos co-writer Adam Rubin and illustrator Mark “Crash” McCreery the Hollywood monster-creator who did the creature design for such films as Rango, Terminator 2, and Jurassic Park, is a blast. A whimsical tale about the legendary Mexican goatsucker, its prose is a tangled form of English and Spanish (“This all happened a long time ago, en una granja de cabras.”) that is good fun, and the illustrations, particularly the goats, which are deflated, inflated, and grow to enormous proportions, will keep kids coming back for more.
(9) The arbitrator may award declaratory or injunctive relief only in favor of the individual party seeking relief and only to the extent necessary to provide relief warranted by that party's individual claim. The arbitrator may not order National Geographic to pay any monies to or take any actions with respect to persons other than you, unless National Geographic explicitly consents in advance, after an arbitrator is selected, to permit the arbitrator to enter such an order. Further, unless National Geographic expressly agrees, the arbitrator may not consolidate other persons’ claims with yours, and may not otherwise preside over any form of a representative, multi-claimant or class proceeding.
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Even if we didn’t spot the Tribe Called Quest and Mingus vinyl in the background,  Zach O’Hora’s tale of mistaken identity — Ralph for Niblet; Niblet for Ralph — has enough sophistication and nuance to amuse adult readers while the sweet simple message (be neighborly) and O’Hora’s strong illustrations (turquoise, ochre, thick black line) make it kiddie catnip.
Creating stories for the youngest book-lover is not child's play. The best books have similar traits. Life-affirming messages pitched appropriately for this audience, in a way that engages, while bringing out the best in an older reader. When it all comes together the result is a book that transcends age. We feel these are the best of the best. (Many of these are available as "board books.")
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